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Local News

  • EDC director plans to leave

    The executive director of Las Vegas’ main economic development group is planning to step down, but he’s not sure when that’ll happen.

    Roberto Rios, director of the Las Vegas-San Miguel Economic Development Corporation, confirmed to the City Council recently that because of personal issues, he would have to leave his position. He has held the job for 13 months.

    He said that given the bad state of the economy, he said it may take some time to find another job, so he may still be at EDC for a while.

  • College seeking six radio stations

    Almost three years ago, Highlands University applied for six low-powered FM radio stations. One of those would include a station for the university’s foundation.

    President Jim Fries said recently that the foundation’s radio station would be in Romeroville, southwest of Las Vegas. The university currently operates KDEP-FM, which is across the street from Ilfeld Auditorium.

    “The Federal Communications Commission has granted Highlands licenses for the communities of Raton, Clayton, Farmington and possibly Milan,” Fries said.

  • House filled with junk -- again

    The situation at Las Vegan Gordy Maxine Thatcher-Godfrey’s house has become something of a rerun.

    But it’s not a rerun her Tilden Street neighbors are interested in watching.

    Again, her house is filled with junk that she collects around town. This has happened before, when neighbors could see old items such as fabrics in her front yard and items filling her home.

    In recent times, an industrial-sized trash bin has been in Thatcher-Godfrey’s front yard. It’s there so people can deposit junk from her house.

  • City OKs ambulance deal, admits it hasn't tracked performance

    The Las Vegas City Council has approved a new three-year contract with a private ambulance provider. But officials admitted that they hadn’t been closely tracking the company’s performance over the last couple of years.

    Albuquerque-based Superior Ambulance has been providing emergency medical services to both the city and the county since 2008. That was after the city and the county ended their relationships with Santa Fe-based Rocky Mountain EMS because of concerns with that company’s performance.

  • City to pay back Highlands for overcharge

    The city will be paying back Highlands University for an overcharge of $600,000 for natural gas.

    In 2007, the city put in a new meter at Highlands’ Connor Hall, but it incorrectly calculated the building’s gas usage by a factor of 10. The average bill jumped from an average of $3,000 a month to $30,000.

    The Connor gas account was just one of 27 the university has with the city.

    Recently, the City Council voted unanimously to give the university credits on its bills over the next 30 months, which was how long the overcharge lasted.

  • HU looks to name buildings

    Highlands University officials are looking at names for the new dorms and the under-construction student center.

    Leveo Sanchez, chairman of the Highlands University Board of Regents, said that until recently, the school didn’t have a policy for naming buildings.

    “Three or four months ago, this board adopted a policy with important criteria that should be taken into consideration to name a facility,” Sanchez said.

  • Firm: Rules would kill wind project

    The company that plans a wind farm in the Valley says a proposed three-mile setback from homes would kill the project.

    Mark Jacobson, business development director for Chicago-based Invenergy, told the San Miguel County Commission this week that the three-mile rule would be far more than what other counties with wind farms require.

    His firm proposed the county go with a 1,500-foot setback — or a little more than a quarter of a mile. Many counties have setbacks as short as 750 feet, Jacobson said.

  • Las Vegans may recognize scenes from movies Sunday at drive-in

    The idea of Cold War-era enemies invading middle America via a paratrooper landing may seem a bit dated in these post-9-11 days, but in the mid-1980s, as tensions between the U.S. and former Soviet Union reached an apex, it was a pretty scary concept.

    That invasion was the idea that kicked off “Red Dawn,” the 1984 film that borrowed Las Vegas for the fictional setting of Calumet, Colo.

  • Bears seen in Vegas

    At least two bears were reportedly seen in Las Vegas on Wednesday and Thursday.

    Residents on Lee Drive, which is on the north side, called the police early Thursday morning about a bear in their neighborhood.

    Belinda Sandoval said her husband, Leonard, a firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service, saw a bear in their front lawn around 6:30 a.m. He was going into his car to go to work and called his wife to tell her about it. She called the police.

  • Michael Gallegos gets two years

    SANTA FE -- Michael Gallegos, 18, was led out of a courtroom in handcuffs after a judge sentenced him to two years in a youth jail.

    Gallegos, the son of former Las Vegas City Councilman Michael Gallegos  Sr., was sentenced after pleading guilty in May to six charges in an August 2008 assaults case involving the sexual attacks of underclassmen team members on Robertson High School’s football team. It happened during a team camp in the Gallinas Canyon.