.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • West class sizes questioned

    A Union Elementary parent wants to know why classes at Union are so much bigger than those at Don Cecilio Elementary.

    The answer: Union is more popular with parents.

    Still, an official said the district plans to better balance out student numbers by classroom next school year.

    During a question-and-answer session at Union Elementary last week, as part of special meeting of the West Las Vegas school board, parent Betsy Sanchez wanted to know why some classes at Don Cecilio Martinez Elementary have as few as eight students.

  • Lawyer mum on charter position

    The Las Vegas city attorney declined to say Wednesday whether he believed local voters passed a new charter, which is the city’s constitution.

    But the city manager didn’t hesitate to give his opinion: The voters passed it.

    Last week, 56 percent of voters voted for the new charter. But some, including former City Attorney Danelle Smith, have argued since the election that a super-majority of 60 percent was required for passage.

  • City manager gets a contract

    With the new mayor breaking a tie, the City Council on Wednesday voted to give the city manager a three-year contract.

    City Manager Timothy Dodge, a Santa Rosa native, will get $95,000 a year, which is what he has been making since the city hired him last spring. Dodge will be able to get increases of 1 to 5 percent a year, based on the council’s evaluations of his performance.

    In another decision, the council voted unanimously to hire interim City Attorney Dave Romero for the permanent position. He’ll make $100,000 a year.

  • Las Vegas man gets 15 years

    In an emotional hearing Monday afternoon, the Las Vegas man accused of killing a 6-year-old girl was sentenced to the maximum of 15 years in prison.

    David Levi Chavez, 22, was convicted by a jury in Santa Rosa last year of second-degree murder in the 2008 death of Jasmine Garcia, who had graduated from kindergarten weeks before her killing.

    Chavez must serve 85 percent of his sentence, District Attorney Richard Flores said. The state Department of Corrections has the authority to knock off 15 percent of the prison sentence for good behavior.

  • New council sworn in

    A new mayor and City Council members are now on the job, and they’ll take part in their first meeting today.

    Alfonso Ortiz, who officially swore in after a canvassing of votes last Wednesday, took the ceremonial oath of office before a crowd of around 200 people at the Plaza Hotel on Monday night.  He replaced Tony Marquez, who didn’t run in last week’s election.

  • Paralegal to run for magistrate

    Ruth Trujillo plans to run for the magistrate judgeship now held by Philip Romero, who hasn’t announced his plans.

    She is a certified paralegal and has 30 years of experience in the judicial system, having retired after working for seven district attorney administrations.

    She worked for an attorney in the private sector for two years and is currently employed as a trial court administrative assistant in the Fourth Judicial District Court.

  • County's building projects done

    Over the last decade, San Miguel County has spent millions of dollars improving its buildings or constructing new ones.

    Now that those projects are done, the county won’t be spending as much on capital outlay for its facilities in the coming years, County Manager Les Montoya said during the County Commission’s mid-year budget review last week.

    He said the county could invest some of its resources on new computers, among other things.

  • Luna trimming its spending

    Like every other state-funded agency in town, Luna Community College is having to cut back spending.

    Recently, the college put out a special edition of its newsletter, Luna Light, to focus on the impact of budget cuts.

  • County approves Pecos development

    The San Miguel County Commission last week approved a four-lot housing development in the Pecos area.

    The residential lots will be about two acres each, and the developer, Bonnie McGowan, will reserve 116 acres for open space — a portion of which would be used for hiking trails, gardens and stables.

    Several speakers during the commission’s meeting last week praised McGowan’s plans for the Hawk’s Landing subdivision.

    However, one nearby resident, M. Dolores White-Vigil, sent a letter to the commission opposing the proposed development.

  • School’s dress code questioned

    Andrea Lucero, the mother of Las Vegas City Schools students, says the district pays more attention to the dress code than education.

    She said one of her daughters spent a month in all-day detention at Memorial Middle School because of a lip ring. She said the daughter decided to keep her ring as a matter of principle; otherwise, Lucero said, the piercing would have closed up.

    “The dress code is ridiculous,” she said. “My daughter has been treated like a common criminal. It’s not like she beat someone up or brought drugs to school.”