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Local News

  • Medical pot user to lose rent subsidy

    Las Vegas resident Robert Jones isn’t shy about saying that he grows marijuana plants in his house. His cancer qualifies him as a legal user.
    But that apparently doesn’t matter to San Miguel County’s housing voucher program — known as Section 8.
    On Oct. 12, the program’s executive director, Gilbert Almanza, informed Jones that he would no longer be getting the Section 8 benefit, effective Nov. 30.

  • Trick or treating to be on Sunday

    The city of Las Vegas is encouraging children to trick-or-treat on Sunday after all.

    Last week, the mayor said the city would ask that kids go trick-or-treating on Saturday.

    But he said the city had a “change of heart” after protests.

    “City Hall was bombarded with calls. People said they wanted Sunday. I hadn’t heard nice comments about Saturday,” the mayor said.
    Old Town merchants are still inviting trick-or-treaters to go to their area Friday afternoon.

  • Las Vegan helps tell region’s story

    Patricia Crespin, who calls Las Vegas home, is set to appear on stage for the upcoming “Bless Me, Ultima” show.

    Crespin is part of award-winning Vortex Theatre’s performance of Rudolfo Anaya’s book- turned-into-play. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Highlands University’s historic Ilfeld Auditorium.

  • State representative faces retired educator in House race

    Retired educator Mel Root is facing state Rep. Richard Vigil, D-Ribera, in the District 70 House race.

    Vigil, a bus contractor, has represented the district since 1999 and beat the Republican Root with 70 percent of the vote two years ago.


    The heavily Democratic district covers much of San Miguel County, including most of Las Vegas, and a small portion of Torrance County.

  • City may put grips on Fiestas

    The city of Las Vegas is proposing greater controls over the Fiesta Council, a group mired in controversy over the last few months.


    Last week, city officials presented a proposed contract between the city and the council that would require the group to provide a 2010 financial report and have the mayor appoint a third of the council’s membership.

  • Trail for bikes, walkers planned

    Ray Finck is a big fan of San Miguel County’s plan to build a pedestrian and bike path along Cinder Road.

    “This will help me immensely,” he said. “I try to use my bicycle anytime I can. I ride my bicycle because it makes me feel better.”

    Finck’s bike was placed in front of a row of shovels stuck in a pile of dirt at the groundbreaking ceremony for the path on Friday.

  • Bond would mean $12M for county

    Margaret McKinney
    Highlands University
    Education Bond D is on the statewide ballot Nov. 2, giving New Mexico voters an opportunity to support infrastructure improvements at public colleges and universities throughout the state.


    Statewide, Bond D would fund $155.2 million in higher education improvements. In San Miguel County, funding would total $12.1 million, with $7.1 million allocated for Highlands University and $5 million allocated for Luna Community College. More details are online at www.educationinnewmexico.com.

  • Local case drew national attention

    Las Vegas has its divisions, but it generally enjoys “relative harmony,” a local historian said at a banquet Friday.


    But from time to time, things come to a head, Las Vegas attorney Jesus Lopez said at the annual banquet of the Citizens Committee for Historic Preservation.


    Lopez, who has a local history program on KFUN every Monday, was the banquet’s keynote speaker. The committee honored property owners who have improved their historic buildings in recent times.

  • County nixes buffers for turbines

    A majority of the San Miguel County Commission this week rejected the idea of creating special zones to keep out wind turbines in the areas along the Pecos and Gallinas rivers.


    County Manager Les Montoya had pushed the idea since August, and at a meeting this week, he and others presented a proposal that would ban wind turbines from being seen from the beds of either of the two rivers.


    “We considered visibility of wind towers as a principal concern within these areas,” the manager said.

  • East chief unhappy with bond adviser

    The top Las Vegas City Schools official said this week that he wasn’t satisfied with the performance of the school district’s bond adviser. 

    Rick Romero, the district’s superintendent, said he had many questions for the adviser, Al Clemmons, in the wake of an unexpected 30 percent property tax increase.


    A taxpayer who forked out $1,500 in property taxes last year will be paying nearly $2,000 this year.