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Local News

  • In Ryan, Obama sees twofold target

    By Ben Feller and Ken Thomas
    The Associated Press

    DES MOINES, Iowa  — In his run for a second term, President Barack Obama had an opponent before he had an opponent: House Republicans. They shellacked him in the midterm elections, blocked much of his legislative agenda and pushed economic views that are wildly different from his.

    Mitt Romney put a campaign face on all that for Obama: Paul Ryan.

  • An inevitable catastrophe?

    By Margaret McKinney
    Highlands University

    A wildfire in the Gallinas Canyon could have catastrophic effects on the Las Vegas water supply, forest, fire and water officials told community leaders during an Aug. 6 tour of the canyon.

  • Temporary home - Shelter offers pets of all kinds

    Cinder, a young bunny, lives in a temporary home at the city of Las Vegas Animal Shelter. Once a roamer, she was caught by animal control, and now awaits a permanent home. The bunny is part of the influx of animals awaiting adoption at the new and improved animal shelter, located near City Hall.

  • City mulling no tolerance on drugs

    Should city of Las Vegas workers who test positive for drugs get a second chance?

    That was one of the question posed to the City Council during last week’s work session — a new monthly meeting that City Manager Timothy Dodge has called in an effort to build consensus among governing board members.

    The second-chance question is one that has divided some city officials.

  • Authorities capture federal fugitives

    The two fugitives authorities were searching for in connection with last week’s drug raid have been captured.

    Las Vegas police received a tip at 12:24 p.m. Monday that Ernestina Gallegos, 32, was in the area of Garfield and Pecos Streets, Chief Christian Montaño said.

    When Las Vegas police arrived at the area, however, they saw U.S. Marshals taking her into custody.

    The chief said that Gallegos appeared to have been taken into custody without incident.  

    Montaño said Gallegos was transported to Albuquerque.

  • Looking Back - August 15, 2012

    In 1962

    Benjamin Coca was named chairman of the Young Republican Organization of San Miguel County at an organizational meeting Monday night. Joe Lujan was the other candidate for chairman of the group.
    Others elected for the coming year are Alfred Nelson, vice chairman; Bernardino Encinias, secretary; Dora Roybal, assistant secretary; and Jose Felix Duran, treasurer

  • Looking Ahead - News - August 15, 2012

    Story Time at Carnegie Library

    Story Time at Carnegie Library returns today (Wednesday). Times are 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. in the children’s area of the public library. This week’s book is “Teacher’s Pets” by Dayle Ann Dodds. Story Time is free and open to the public.

  • Weather - August 15, 2012

    Wednesday
    Isolated showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 86. West wind 5-10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20 percent. Scattered showers and thunderstorms at night. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 59. North wind 5-10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30 percent.

    Thursday

  • Pecos Canyon facing upkeep woes

    The Associated Press

    SANTA FE — Pecos Canyon in northern New Mexico is suffering from limited maintenance.

    Trash bins at several camping and picnic sites in the canyon area are overflowing at the end of summer weekends.

    The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish manages several camping and picnic sites in the recreation area and has done what it can to clean them up, but that managing campground isn’t the wildlife agency’s business.

  • Indian leaders concerned about sacred sites

    By Susan Montaya Bryan
    The Associated Press

    ALBUQUERQUE — The Obama administration on Monday began reaching out to Native American political and spiritual leaders to address concerns over the protection of sacred sites on federal land.

    Tribal leaders said they’re frustrated. Some feel consultation between the federal government and tribes has become just a formality despite promises by the administration to improve discussions.