.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Official says city revenue 'coming in pretty steadily'

    The city of Las Vegas is loosening its financial spigot.

    Despite a tough economy, the city was within a percentage point of its projected revenue for the last fiscal year, which ended June 30. City officials said they had prepared a conservative budget for this year to prepare for difficult times.

    But City Manager Timothy Dodge told the City Council last week that things are better than expected.

    “The general fund revenues are coming in pretty steadily,” he said.

  • Short-staffed village hall closes for day

    Wagon Mound’s village hall was closed Monday because the only remaining office employee called in sick.

    The only employee is an office aide. The former clerk-treasurer, who runs the village’s day-to-day operations, left last Friday after only a few weeks on the job.

    The utilities clerk’s position has been vacant since the village terminated Gloria Mejillas a few months ago.

    Meanwhile, Mayor Art Arguello has placed the utilities superintendent on unpaid administrative leave. Arguello didn’t reveal the reasons in an interview.

  • National Ave. may go one-way

    Las Vegas' traffic patterns could be changed dramatically if Highlands University makes National Avenue into a one-way street.

    The Highlands Board of Regents last week approved a master plan that includes that change to National. It was part of a plan designed by Denver-based architectural firm StudioINSITE.

  • Repeat DWI suspects charged

    The state police have arrested two more repeat DWI offenders, reports state.

    Alfred M. Ulibarri, 39, 1317 Keen St., was charged with aggravated DWI for his fourth offense, and Jose A. Mendoza, 40, of Los Lunas, was arrested for his third DWI, state police said.

    Shortly before midnight July 22, a state police officer noticed Ulibarri on New Mexico Avenue speeding a few miles per hour over the limit, so the officer stopped him, according to a police report.

  • Ortiz: City may run Fiestas

    Mayor Alfonso Ortiz said last week it’s possible that the city could take over the operations of Fiestas de Las Vegas. He called it a “viable option.”

    For years, a nonprofit group known as the Fiesta Council has run the annual event, which is during the Fourth of July weekend.

    Still, the city is heavily involved with the festivities. It sets up the dance floor and bleachers, readies the park and provides help with public works, solid waste, fire protection and law enforcement.

  • Relying on rain

    Four years ago, Ojitos Frios subdivision resident Jack Thompson saw his well level dropping. And so did his neighbors.

    These days, Thompson and many of them have seen their wells go dry. As of last count, 62 households southwest of Las Vegas are without well water.

    Many of them now get their water trucked in. A few others, including Thompson, have resorted to rain catchment systems.

    But catchment systems are expensive. Thompson, whose well went dry over a year ago, paid more than $20,000 for his — a cost he readily admits most people can’t afford.

  • Sentencing for hazing suspect delayed; attorney is sick

    SANTA FE — Final resolution in the Michael Gallegos case will have to wait a while longer.

    Gallegos, 19, had been scheduled for sentencing Friday morning in a Santa Fe district courtroom for his role in the August 2008 Robertson High football hazing scandal. But a reported bout with kidney stones prevented Gallegos’ lead attorney, Billy Blackburn, from attending the hearing, and a postponement was ordered by Judge Mark Macaron.

    Both sides acknowledged that the delay was necessary, albeit an inconvenience to participants.

  • HU president's contract extended

    Highlands University regents last week extended the contract of President Jim Fries by three years.

    The president’s pay will stay at $232,000 a year. Fries, 67, started in early 2007.

    Regent Chairman Leveo Sanchez said after the board discussed the president’s performance over the last three and a half years, it voted unanimously to extend the president’s contract.

  • Speed bumps popular in Vegas

    Las Vegas has many more speed bumps than most communities — and residents regularly ask for more.

    Some towns have none.

    At this week’s City Council meeting, resident Carl Vigil presented a petition to city officials and asked for speed bumps in his west-side neighborhood of Creston Circle. He said speeding is a particular problem near the park in that neighborhood.

    “We’re afraid a kid may be run over,” he said.

    Under a city ordinance, speed bumps and humps are allowed only near schools.

  • Council OKs big hikes to trash rates

    In a divided vote, the Las Vegas City Council on Wednesday approved big increases in garbage rates.

    Under the new rates, residents will see their monthly bills immediately go up from $14.05 to $15.60 a month to cover this fiscal year’s solid waste deficit.

    On Feb. 1, residential bills will jump from $15.60 to $20.10. The two increases amount to about 43 percent.

    Commercial users will see even steeper rises in their bills.

    Overall, the city expects to see a 59 percent rise in revenue for the solid waste department.