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Local News

  • City OKs ambulance deal, admits it hasn't tracked performance

    The Las Vegas City Council has approved a new three-year contract with a private ambulance provider. But officials admitted that they hadn’t been closely tracking the company’s performance over the last couple of years.

    Albuquerque-based Superior Ambulance has been providing emergency medical services to both the city and the county since 2008. That was after the city and the county ended their relationships with Santa Fe-based Rocky Mountain EMS because of concerns with that company’s performance.

  • City to pay back Highlands for overcharge

    The city will be paying back Highlands University for an overcharge of $600,000 for natural gas.

    In 2007, the city put in a new meter at Highlands’ Connor Hall, but it incorrectly calculated the building’s gas usage by a factor of 10. The average bill jumped from an average of $3,000 a month to $30,000.

    The Connor gas account was just one of 27 the university has with the city.

    Recently, the City Council voted unanimously to give the university credits on its bills over the next 30 months, which was how long the overcharge lasted.

  • HU looks to name buildings

    Highlands University officials are looking at names for the new dorms and the under-construction student center.

    Leveo Sanchez, chairman of the Highlands University Board of Regents, said that until recently, the school didn’t have a policy for naming buildings.

    “Three or four months ago, this board adopted a policy with important criteria that should be taken into consideration to name a facility,” Sanchez said.

  • Firm: Rules would kill wind project

    The company that plans a wind farm in the Valley says a proposed three-mile setback from homes would kill the project.

    Mark Jacobson, business development director for Chicago-based Invenergy, told the San Miguel County Commission this week that the three-mile rule would be far more than what other counties with wind farms require.

    His firm proposed the county go with a 1,500-foot setback — or a little more than a quarter of a mile. Many counties have setbacks as short as 750 feet, Jacobson said.

  • Las Vegans may recognize scenes from movies Sunday at drive-in

    The idea of Cold War-era enemies invading middle America via a paratrooper landing may seem a bit dated in these post-9-11 days, but in the mid-1980s, as tensions between the U.S. and former Soviet Union reached an apex, it was a pretty scary concept.

    That invasion was the idea that kicked off “Red Dawn,” the 1984 film that borrowed Las Vegas for the fictional setting of Calumet, Colo.

  • Bears seen in Vegas

    At least two bears were reportedly seen in Las Vegas on Wednesday and Thursday.

    Residents on Lee Drive, which is on the north side, called the police early Thursday morning about a bear in their neighborhood.

    Belinda Sandoval said her husband, Leonard, a firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service, saw a bear in their front lawn around 6:30 a.m. He was going into his car to go to work and called his wife to tell her about it. She called the police.

  • Michael Gallegos gets two years

    SANTA FE -- Michael Gallegos, 18, was led out of a courtroom in handcuffs after a judge sentenced him to two years in a youth jail.

    Gallegos, the son of former Las Vegas City Councilman Michael Gallegos  Sr., was sentenced after pleading guilty in May to six charges in an August 2008 assaults case involving the sexual attacks of underclassmen team members on Robertson High School’s football team. It happened during a team camp in the Gallinas Canyon.

  • Official says city revenue 'coming in pretty steadily'

    The city of Las Vegas is loosening its financial spigot.

    Despite a tough economy, the city was within a percentage point of its projected revenue for the last fiscal year, which ended June 30. City officials said they had prepared a conservative budget for this year to prepare for difficult times.

    But City Manager Timothy Dodge told the City Council last week that things are better than expected.

    “The general fund revenues are coming in pretty steadily,” he said.

  • Short-staffed village hall closes for day

    Wagon Mound’s village hall was closed Monday because the only remaining office employee called in sick.

    The only employee is an office aide. The former clerk-treasurer, who runs the village’s day-to-day operations, left last Friday after only a few weeks on the job.

    The utilities clerk’s position has been vacant since the village terminated Gloria Mejillas a few months ago.

    Meanwhile, Mayor Art Arguello has placed the utilities superintendent on unpaid administrative leave. Arguello didn’t reveal the reasons in an interview.

  • National Ave. may go one-way

    Las Vegas' traffic patterns could be changed dramatically if Highlands University makes National Avenue into a one-way street.

    The Highlands Board of Regents last week approved a master plan that includes that change to National. It was part of a plan designed by Denver-based architectural firm StudioINSITE.