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Local News

  • Jail Log, Sunday's Optic, Feb. 18, 2018

    The following individuals were booked into the San Miguel County Detention Center between Feb. 10 and Feb. 13, 2018:
    Phillip Conway Trujillo, Adult Probation Warrant; Possession, Delivery Or Manufacture Of Drug Paraphernalia, Las Vegas Municipal Court.
    Fidel Garcia, Driving On Suspended / Revoked License, San Miguel Magistrrate / Sandoval County.
    Jason A. Jaramillo, Felony Warrant, San Miguel District Court.
    Misty Martinez, Bench Warrant, Bernalillo Metro Court.

  • NMHU has welcome center, visit specialist

    By Margaret McKinney, N.M. Highlands University

    New Mexico Highlands University recently launched a new Welcome Center and other campus visit services geared toward prospective student’s individual academic interests.
    Crystal Burch is the new campus visit specialist at Highlands.

    Burch has worked in higher education for nearly seven years. Previously, she served as Highlands’ admissions specialist in the Office of Student Recruitment and Undergraduate Admissions.

  • More reflections of Company C

    By Maurilio Vigil, Special to the Optic

    The following is the second in a multi-part series. Part one can be found here: goo.gl/mH39uU

    Frank Rodriguez recalls a fresh new lieutenant insisting the men shave every day, and the New Mexican curse words they said to each other in pondering the idea of shaving in combat.

  • District buys building near school

    During its regular monthly meeting Tuesday night, the West Las Vegas School Board of Education approved the district’s offer of $69,000 to purchase a property at 1928 New Mexico Ave., formerly known as Pretty Paws Pet Grooming.

    Board Chairman Marvin Martinez said the property is across from Don Cecilio Martinez Elementary School, and if the sale is approved by the state, the existing parking at the building will be used by the school district.

  • Last-minute shuffles cement state budget deal

    By Andrew Oxford, Santa Fe New Mexican

    SANTA FE — It took moving a few million dollars here and putting a few million dollars there, but New Mexico had a budget by the end of Wednesday.

    A $6.3 billion spending plan is on its way to Gov. Susana Martinez after the Senate and House of Representatives brokered a compromise on slightly different budgets approved by both chambers.

  • Early education proposal dies without hearing

    By Milan Simonich, Santa Fe New Mexican

    SANTA FE — The proposal to expand early childhood education across New Mexico died quietly Tuesday at the state Capitol, scotched because a vote on the initiative will not be taken in the state Senate Finance Committee.

    Sen. John Arthur Smith, the Democrat from Deming who chairs the committee, said in an interview that he had decided not to give a hearing to the proposed constitutional amendment before the legislative session ends at noon Thursday.

  • Lawmakers send omnibus crime bill to governor’s desk

    By Milan Simonich, Santa Fe New Mexican

    SANTA FE — New Mexico legislators rolled five different crime bills into one, then sent the measure to the governor Wednesday in what they called a bipartisan move to make communities and prisons safer.
    State senators approved the plan, House Bill 19, on a vote of 32-2. The measure already had cleared the House of Representatives on a 66-1 vote.

  • Legislature In Brief from Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018

    The Santa Fe New Mexican

    House rules: Think of the rules of the state House of Representatives as the traffic code for part of New Mexico’s democratic process. The rules lay out how the chamber passes bills, conducts debates and even how members should dress on the floor (bolo ties are expressly permitted).

    The House made a few tweaks to those rules on Wednesday.

  • SMC Commission adopts own code of ethics

    Does the San Miguel County Commission need its very own code of ethics?

    Apparently, it does.

  • Luna Trustees hear inventory report

    Luna Community College's Board of Trustees are hearing about many different issues this year as the college tries to catch up on items that have been allowed to slide for years and years.