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Education

  • Dear Teacher - Feb. 7, 2015

    By Marge Eberts
    and Peggy Gisler

    Question: My son is in a history class where so much of the teaching seems to come from technology. Does so much technology belong in the classroom? — Worried

    Answer: Digital technology plays a major role in many of today’s classrooms. However, even though students are on their computers, iPads, iPhones and other devices finding new information, the debate still continues over whether technology can or should partially or entirely replace the face-to-face interaction of teachers and students.

  • Students of the month - Feb. 7, 2015
  • Five graduates return to coach high school speech team

    By Malena Ward
    Kearney Hub

    LEXINGTON, Neb. — Five graduates of Lexington High School are coaching the school’s speech team, the same team they once competed on together.

  • Remembering one-room schools

    By Eric Negley
    LNP newspapes

    MILLERSVILLE, Pa. — Gladys Mohler vividly remembers her first school.

    When she set off for class in the fall of 1932, the Excelsior School was just over the fence from her parents’ farm in Manor Township.

    Her dog would follow her to the little brick schoolhouse.

    “The teacher would let her come in and lie down by my desk,” Mohler reminisces.

    The one-room school let her hear the older students’ lessons, which helped Mohler learn enough to skip the second grade.

  • Dear Teacher - Jan. 31, 2016

    By Marge Eberts and Peggy Gisler

    Question: My children in grades three and five never write anything but school assignments. Is there any way to entice them to write more? — Concerned

    Answer: You are lucky that your children still pick up a pencil or pen to do their homework. In many schools that have gone totally paperless, children only use their computers for any form of written communication. When you talk about writing, you are talking about fine motor skills that are harder to learn and require more practice to develop than other motor skills.

  • Mississippi teacher honored for 40-years in education field

    By Alex Swatson
    The Vicksburg Post

    VICKSBURG, Miss.  — For more than 40 years, Gwendolyn Yates affected lives in a positive manner as an educator.

    Her saying “great teachers beget great teachers” is her way of giving back to former instructors who set her down a path of educational service.

    Yates was awarded with the 2015 NAACP Community Service Award on Dec. 27. She was nominated by Walter Sheriff and John Shorter, president of the local chapter presented her with the award at Standfield New Life Christian Church.

  • Louisiana educator, referee lives for two jobs

    By Corey Vaughn

    The Daily Iberian

    ST. MARTINVILLE, La. — After 40 years dedicated to education and officiating high school and junior high basketball games, Walter Pickney has a simple answer for why he does what he does.

    “It’s for the kids. When I was young I saw a lot of kids in bad shape and I wanted to help out,” Pickney said.

  • Back to the Books
  • A recipe for success

    By Mercy López
    Las Vegas Optic

    MORA — The interior of the Joseph Montoya gymnasium at Mora High School is filled with athletic banners celebrating state championships and other athletic achievements. On Thursday afternoon, another banner was unveiled in front of hundreds of students at the “Home of the Champions.”

    This time, however, the banner celebrates the school’s academic success.

  • Dear Teacher - Jan. 17, 2016

    By Marge Eberts
    and Peggy Gisler
    Readers: With the school year reaching its halfway point, it’s a good time to think about the standardized tests looming ahead. For some students there is a lot of anxiety surrounding these tests. Being successful in school certainly rests on students being good test-takers. Fortunately, there are a few things that parents can do to help their children approach these tests with more confidence.

    First of all, you need to know that standardized tests are prepared by testing companies, not by the classroom teacher.