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Today's News

  • EDITORIAL: Making it fair

    The San Miguel County Commission last week passed an ordinance allowing the county to file liens on properties in which owners don’t pay their solid waste bills.

    This decision comes a few months after the county put a bunch of accounts on inactive status after it became apparent that they were uncollectible.

    The commissioners said they felt it was unfair that some people always pay their bills, while others don’t and essentially get away with it.

    This new ordinance will eliminate this inherent inequity.

  • LETTER: Congratulations to HU's leaders

    Congratulations to Highlands University for not only being financially sound but for once again being a stable force in Northern New Mexico. It has been nearly two years since James Fries took the reins to my alma mater and I want to thank him and the regents for having the vision to move forward. I remember not too long ago when Highlands was an at-risk university.

  • Harvey Girls made mark

    Javier Gonzales is leaving the Highlands University Board of Regents after nearly four years to take a seat on the New Mexico State University Board of Regents.

    Gonzales, an NMSU graduate, has been chairman of the Highlands regents for much of his time on the board.

    Gov. Bill Richardson announced Gonzales’ appointment to New Mexico State on Monday.

    Gonzales, who is the Highlands regents’ senior member, has been at the helm during turbulent times at the university.

  • EDITORIAL: Lawmakers are lobbyists

    A few weeks ago, state Rep. Richard Vigil, D-Ribera, suggested the Las Vegas City Council hire a lobbyist to help the community get money for needed projects.

    In making the recommendation, Vigil had good intentions for Las Vegas. But we disagree with his advice. Hiring a lobbyist would be a poor use of city money.

  • Highlands regents chairman leaving to NMSU

    In 1882, Fred Harvey, the owner of the now-defunct chain of Harvey Houses, dedicated a restaurant at the Montezuma Castle before a crowd of 400 people.

    The restaurant has long since closed, the building now being occupied by the United World College.

  • COLUMN: Strength in numbers

    Yes, it’s a cliche, but there is strength in numbers. Those with more power know this rule better than anybody else.

    Last week, a city advisory task force told the City Council that film companies negotiate individually with local merchants who are affected by their productions.

    That leads to some businesses getting better compensation than others. Those with weaker negotiating skills jump at the first offer.

  • City set to finish Legion

    The Legion Drive project was delayed by a week recently because the contractor didn’t use materials that met state standards, officials said last week.

     

    City Manager Sharon Caballero said the city’s public works department discovered a deficiency in the base course. Because of the problem, she said the contractor couldn’t wet down the surface, which residents have requested to prevent dust problems.

     

    She expects the project to be completed this week.

     

  • COLUMN: Police Misconduct

     What remedies do people have if they are mistreated by law enforcement officers? Last week an interim legislative committee considered the question and heard evidence that there isn’t much that can be done under present law.

    Testimony indicated that complaints to local officials seldom result in any action. Albuquerque has some police oversight mechanisms but no one present recommended them as being models others should use.

  • Officials embarrassed about parks

    The report on city parks was damning: Bungee cords holding bleachers together. No trash cans in sight. A makeshift dump.

    Last week, a task force assigned to provide recommendations for the city’s parks and recreation center didn’t have much good to say.

    The City Council’s reaction: It’s embarrassing.

    In the summer, Mayor Tony Marquez appointed a seven-member task force to examine the city’s parks and recreation center.

  • Lady Card spikers back in Final Four

    For the second year in a row, the Robertson volleyball team (16-9) is one of the final four playing in Class 3A.

    The Lady Cardinals scored a 3-1 win Thursday morning against Lovington, then surprised fifth-seeded St. Michael's 3-1 in an afternoon quarterfinal.

    Next is a semifinal with another District 2-3A rival, Pojoaque Valley, set for 4 p.m. Friday at the University of New Mexico’s Johnson Center in Albuquerque.