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Today's Features

  • What do you get when you have 20 fingers, two hands, 88 keys, and the brains and talent of two concert pianists? You get wonderful music and that’s what you’ll get on Saturday, Dec. 8, at 3 pm at First United Presbyterian Church, in “A Little Light Music.” “A Little Light Music” is presented by the Nat Gold Players and is a benefit for the NGP lighting system.

  • Red clay barracks crumble in the ceaseless winds enveloping Fort Union National Monument. The wind is older than the clay.

    It pushed itself against the first sentry tower, against the legions of horse and men protecting the prairie. Wagon ruts meander over the gently rolling landscape, face the wind with earth scarred, defiant. The clay holds mystery, holds the almost forgotten memory of man against man.

  • Snow swirled around around the darkened street lamps during last year’s electric light parade. Las Vegas families bundled in heavy coats and scarves waited along Carnegie Library park, faces red from the biting cold.

    Floats made from ranch flatbeds, from carefully waxed pickup trucks loaded with twinkle light-encrusted twisted wire crawled the parade route, accompanied by holiday music. Sara Martinez, 9, grabbed the mittened hand of a friend and leaned into the street, as if her anticipation could pull Santa’s sleigh closer.

  • A performance by the Highlands University Jazz Choir directed by Andr Garca-Nuthmann will highlight an open house at the City of Las Vegas Museum and the launching of the Friends of the Museum’s new endowment campaign. The public is invited and can view special collections of the museum that are not currently on display.

  • Ilfeld Auditorium will resonate with the spirited music of the NMHU Marching Band and Jazz Ensemble in a concert on Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m. Featured pieces include “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” and “Conquistador,” and big band arrangements “Quintado” and “The Heat’s On.”

  • Andre Garcia-Nuthmann’s voice swells with pride when he speaks of his choirs.

    “Last Spring we did a huge Vivaldi concert with the Santa Fe Symphony. We performed this summer at the National Hispanic Center in Albuquerque, again with the Santa Fe Symphony, and we travelled to Europe to perform at the Classical Music Festival celebrating Haydn’s 275th Birthday. Every year we just get better and better. And all of this is due to our incredibly loyal community members.”

  • Most of us who were born in Las Vegas never leave the area. Trips to Albuquerque and Denver normally shape the edge of the world we live in. But I have discovered that places like Mexico, Europe and Japan are not that far away and you should take advantage. Start finding out about the programs with your counselor at school. He or she can show you programs that help you experience Washington, D.C., for week-long seminar or live with a family in Denmark. Rotary and People to People Student Ambassador have international exchange programs.

  • Eleven teenagers swayed in formation on the carpeted floor of the United World College Student Center. Their bodies dipped low, hips rocking to an a cappella beat. Their audience — a group of 20 local middle school students — watched, eyes wide, surprised to hear young men and women chant about a subject usually taboo.

    “We’re rapping, we’re rapping, and you should, too! Wearing a condom will help protect you!”

  • I’ve heard it said that all small towns are alike. Generally, I disagree. Towns, because they are made up of the people who live in them, are very much like people themselves. Each one has its own personality.

  • Laura Swartz lifted her arm parallel to floor. A red-tailed hawk dug into her denim shirt. The steady arch of his beak feigned nonchalance, but his eyes captured every tiny motion in the room.

    Swartz wore a heavy canvas glove for protection. Her movements were sure, rehearsed. She spread the hawk’s right wing. An audience of forty Las Vegas residents leaned forward to examine the raptor’s plumage.