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Today's Features

  • As three movies were filming in town last month I came to realize that the world has discovered our secret, and how great Las Vegas really is.

    When I drive down Seventh and Eighth streets, I see rows of Victorian homes. On the west side of town there are hundreds of traditional southwestern homes, which show off the architecture of the original Las Vegas. I am told that the same houses in another part of the country would cost five to 10 times as much and that the Victorians would be priced at least $1 million.

  • My Polish grandma died five years ago. Babcia lived in the middle apartment of a triple tenement house in New England for all of her married life. She worked all those years, too, in a beat-up shoe factory she called the “coop.” When I was a kid, I thought she meant it like a chicken coop, a place of barbed wire and rows of feathered ladies like hens producing shiny patent leather inventory. Later I learned it was really short for The Cooperative. Babcia spent long days drilling tiny holes into men’s wing- tipped shoes. She was an artist.

  • A middle-aged women sits on a rugged brick floor, arms folded tightly across her chest, a thick plaid blanket tucked around her waist. A corner of white fabric lies next to her, suggesting a selection of unseen tooled silver, perhaps tiny spiral earrings, or delicate belt conchos in the shape of the zia. Her slightly pained expression speaks of fatigue, of crisp Santa Fe air. Deborah Paisner’s oil painting, “Carol at the Palace of Governors,” examines contemplation, waiting, longing — the emotions of time, the emotions of every working woman.

  • The National Park Service and Fort Union National Monument announces its monthly “Glimpses of the Past” presentation entitled “Footlights in the Foothills, A Glimpse of the Theatrical Past of Las Vegas and Fort Union.”

  • “It’s bigger, and people are appreciating the roominess” said Nancy Colalillo, owner of Tome on the Range.

    It’s no surprise. Tome on the Range relocated to much roomier digs last Friday, and the new space, at 158 Bridge Street, is not just bigger, it’s better.

    The first improvement is in used books. Tome on the Range specialized in new books, with its sister store, Second Tome Around, focusing on used books. But Second Tome Around closed last year.

  • Holy Week begins Sunday with an event chronicled in all four Gospels — Palm Sunday, a remembrance of Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, when people lining the road pressed their best cloaks, pressed branches of small trees into the dry earth before him in a gesture of admiration and respect.

    Today, Catholics hold stark green blessed palm fronds, or boughs of native trees, during Palm Sunday Mass as they participate in the Lord’s Passion, a recital of Jesus’ last steps before death and resurrection.

  • A good friend of mine often says that anything is possible, but not everything is possible. This will probably never be as clear as it is at 17 and 18. Let me explain.

  • New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) announced today that funding will be available under the New Mexico Specialty Crops Program. Funds are available to New Mexico organizations and individuals that have a long-term commitment to improving the economic viability of New Mexico’s rural economy or have projects with a significant value-added potential.

  • The Taos County Economic Development Corporation, or TCEDC, has a mobile Matanza which slaughters beef, pigs and sheep for ranchers and can have them packaged for sale to consumers. The Matanza will travel as far south as Las Vegas, and can slaughter and hang up to 16 head of beef at a time.

  • Four New Mexico Highlands music students will perform in the Thomas Mishler Scholarship Recital at 3 p.m. March 9 in Kennedy Lounge.

    Each year, music students compete for this esteemed scholarship by submitting a resume of their musical experience and an essay describing what music means to them. References from professors and other community members are included in the application. Members of the music department, along with Professor Robert Mishler and his wife Ann, review the candidates and make their selections.