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Today's Features

  • An deliberately uneven row of paintings hangs against a colorful marbleized wall; traditional representations of Native American women and children in ochre and green, fantastic pointillist pieces in shades of the rainbow, mixed media depictions of moving dancers, of ristras swinging from adobe porches.

    Neita Fran Ward stands in the doorway of her WarDancer Gallery’s door, eyeing the carefully chosen collection.

  • Peter Skelton points with pride to the many seedlings growing outside his greenhouse at Memorial Middle Schools. The seedlings, of concord grapes, and some special varieties of apple and apricot, have all been grafted onto hardy rootstock by his students.

    “We are researching which strains are appropriate for this bioregion,” Skelton said. “We are also using this to teach the students the differences between hybrids and clones.”

  • When I first heard of The Flying Star Caf,” it sounded like some sort of Chinese Buffet to me, so I agreed to go, even though I had no idea what it was.

    On this particular day, I am completely surprised when I walk in, because it is definitely not even close to a buffet.

    My eyes take in nothing but bright colors. An orange ceiling transforms into different shades of green, purple and yellow.

  • The summer before my sophomore year of high school was a summer of change and adventure. It might’ve seemed like an ordinary summer at the time, but looking back, I can clearly see that it was different. It was the summer the sixth Harry Potter book came out. It was the summer before my sister started college. It was the first summer I attended summer camp. It was the last summer I spent with my best friend before she moved to Texas.

  • A little brown dog lays in an astral bed, his twitching body on a mat covered in the word “bone,” one eye tipped toward heaven.

    A studded collar rings his neck, the studs echoing a cascade of colorful dots as if the dog sleeps in space, his body ringed with licks of fire. Artist Marcia Henning’s “Harpo Dreaming,” an acrylic on canvas painting, celebrates the life and hopeful afterlife of a dearly departed pet in her June exhibition at Traveler’s Cafe.

  • There are so many thoughts and questions about the future during graduation. It really begins the day that senior week starts For some, it begins on Sunday, for the senior mass, and for others it begins on Monday at the “mandatory” baccalaureate.

    We pull our gowns over our heads for the first time and laugh at how funny they look. Going back to baccalaureate, why even have it? All week everyone was asking, “What is baccalaureate”? The only response that came up was “some inspirational talk.” Why are any of these rituals necessary?

  • Pianist Linda King and violinist Krzysztof Zimowski will join forces in a recital of music for violin and piano, and solo piano, on Sunday, June 1, at 3 p.m. at Kennedy Hall on the NMHU campus. They will play music by Wieniawski, Schubert, Chopin, and Beethoven, including the famous “Moonlight” Piano Sonata.

  • A woman and man dance, arms arched together in continuous embrace. The woman’s hair cascades down her shoulders, following the curve of her back. Her right foot reaches beneath her man’s legs, giving the terra cotta sculpture a breath of captured movement, of music

  • A row of Las Vegans stand at the front of the First United Presbyterian altar prior to Sunday service, smarty dressed in white dress shirts and black cotton gloves. They wait, each holding the handle of a gilded bell.

    Conductor Karyl Lyne raises her arms, pointing at one ringer, then another, coaxing tones into the sanctuary. A cascade of clear chimes fills the space. The music is gentle, familiar, reminiscent of Christmas, of old-fashioned weddings. The ringers concentrate, lifting each bell and thrusting it with precision.

  • A disciplined and serious — and lighthearted — group of young people prowled and pounced around the wood-floored room. They were practicing a song from the musical Cats. Clear strong voices filled the air. This group of sixteen singers from the West Las Vegas High School Honors Choir will delight music-lovers at the City of Las Vegas Museum on Wednesday, May 21, at 6 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Friends of the City of Las Vegas Museum.