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Today's Features

  • A 10-foot banner pinned to the wall of the Elks Lodge 408 welcomed veterans to a mid-day lunch on Sunday in appreciation for the sacrifices they have made for their country. The meal included spaghetti, garlic bread and all the fixings.

    Elks leader Angela Sanchez said this is the third year her organization has been honoring veterans with a free lunch. She said through the year, Elks members sponsor many events to help veterans and their families.

  • The lion is still with us; you just can’t see him.

    Last month, a construction crew surrounded New Town’s lion fountain statue with a small wooden building, complete with a pitched roof.

    This was done after a study found that the statue in Lion’s Park was in poor condition. Officials feared that cold weather would further damage it.

    The lion statue, which is at Lincoln and Grand avenues, has taken a beating over the years, its tail broken off and upper lip removed. Graffiti partially covers it.

  • Tito and Mary Chavez are celebrating a quarter century at their business, Tito's Gallery, on Bridge Street, where they sell jewelry.

    “This week we had an order from the United Kingdom,” Mary said. “The best part about our gallery is the people we get to meet, and all the friends we make by being here — that’s the best part.”

    “And then we’re surrounded by all this beautiful art, and it doesn’t stay the same, it changes. So, our motto is, “An art show every day, and we really believe that,” Tito said.  

  • Civil War Pvt. Chauncey Flower was remembered for his service to his country in a tribute that included the always stirring playing of taps.

    Las Vegas veterans representing Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1547, along with Flower’s great grandchildren and a few guests, honored the fallen soldier who is buried in the state hospital’s cemetery.

    Enlisting as a private in Company G, 56th Infantry Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia of 1863, Flower came forward during a moment of pressing need. But his life was also colorful and at times tragic.

  • People stood shoulder to shoulder at times to see the third annual Dia de los Muertos Art Exhibit at Burris Hall and the Ray Drew Gallery on the Highlands University campus last week.

    Casa de Cultura Executive Director Miguel Angel said many schools and clubs participated in the exhibit that commemorates the celebration of life.

    As people learn more about Dia de los Muertos, they are less likely to connect it with the American holiday Halloween, which is celebrated with a lot of ghoulish good cheer, organizers said.

  • Martha Johnsen says she’s a “hometown girl,” and with the exception of working for NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston for about year and a half, she has always lived in Las Vegas.

    “This town has everything. We have history, we have the really fun notoriety, we have the architecture, many natural resources that are accessible and close by, and I just love the people. I love going out and running into somebody I know — I love that feeling and I don’t think it can be equaled,” Johnsen said.

  • Sage Harrington is living her dream as she performs her songs at venues around town.

    The singer-songwriter has a contagious laugh and a quirky sense of humor that she often uses when writing her brand of lyrics.

    In the sitcom, “Friends,” one of the unforgettable characters was Phoebe, played by Lisa Kudrow. Some of Phoebe’s song titles were “Smelly Cat,” “Crazy Underwear” and “Cremated Mother.”

  • Highlands University’s refurbished engineering building on 11th Street will go a long way in helping students who often struggle with math and science, officials say.

    “This is going to be a building that’s really going to help our students learn to some basic math and science skills, and go on to better their lives.,” said Bill Taylor, the university’s vice president for finance and administration.

  • Whether he’s walking down the street or sitting at his favorite eatery, Arthur LaCombe Vargas might not strike one as the typical lawyer. Depending on our own experiences with legal situations, each of us probably has a preferred generalization.

  • Ten local dancers got to show off their moves far away from the Meadow City.

    In August, the dancers between the ages of 12 and 15 attended a weeklong global dance conference in Kingston, Jamaica. Sponsored by Dance and the Child International and hosted jointly by the University of the West Indies and Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, the conference was open to dancers and dance companies.

    The dancers are members of the Las Vegas Children’s Dance Theater under the direction of Kathleen Kingsley.