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Today's Features

  • There are a few vantages from which to view our current economic malaise.

    Some see it as an isolated bump in the road that can be fixed by the gummint doling out largesse to Wall Street and other failed ventures.

    Others, like myself, see  our current economic troubles as the first, spreading crack in an edifice on the verge of collapse.

    Let me tell you why.

  • When it comes to government, Robertson High School teacher Brenda Ortega-Benavidez’s students know much more than what the three branches of government are. They’re something of experts in political science.

    Her students have just returned from the state Capitol, where they took part in a Constitution Mock Congress competition. It was the first time RHS students placed in the statewide “We the People” Congress, tying for fourth place.

  • Students at Sierra Vista Elementary School found that a small gesture of kindness can create a lot of magic.

    Teacher Tom Conklin spearheaded a schoolwide drive for UNICEF raising $416.50 for underprivileged kids in many countries. He said the donations help with vaccinations, food, clean water, blankets, school books and many other necessities.  

    First-grader Amor Roybal said, “It made me feel good to collect money for the kids who are sick and don’t have any money or clothing.”

  • A unit of the New Mexico National Guard last week held an exercise with local agencies to prepare for the possibility of a hazardous materials incident.

    The 64th Civil Support Team from Rio Rancho supports state and local authorities for manmade and natural disasters and incidents involving weapons of mass destruction and hazardous materials.

  • Carmen Baca teaches both American and British literature at West Las Vegas High School. And she has a clear favorite between the two.

    “British literature. I’m more comfortable with it. I don’t know why,” she said. “American literature is dry.”

    A Las Vegas native, Baca has spent her entire 32-year teaching career in the West district. She spent her first six years at Valley Junior High, but she moved on to the high school in 1983.

  • “The Animals Thanksgiving" narrator Vincent Pacheco told his packed classroom at Sierra Vista Elementary that Thanksgiving Day is a happy holiday, filled with good eating and family fun. 

  • As this year draws to a close, those who want to take advantage of federal and state tax credits for the installation of a solar energy system on their 2009 tax returns need to act soon.

  • It’s winter again, cold, and there’s snow on the ground.

    But I LIKE snow on the ground. 

    Every time we get snow on the ground, it is a prime opportunity to go outside and do some basic observation.

  • The term “weight training” might suggest a roomful of hard bodies in a gym working on building their six packs and puffing as they lift huge barbells.

    Flip the scene to the Night Owl, where Karen Topping, an exercise instructor, stands in front of a bar counter on which a sound system pipes out “Duke of Earl,” “The Wanderer,” and other blasts from the past. It is almost reminiscent of sock hops of the ‘60s.

  • Krystle King and Tamara Naranjo are the head coaches of the 2009 varsity cheerleader squads for the East and West school districts. Both have championship rings and great histories in their own right and lead their perspective squads to do what cheerleaders have always done — lead.

    “A cheerleader means taking academics seriously, it means making sure when someone is down, you get them up. It is an honor, a responsibility and a privilege to wear that uniform,” King said.