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Today's Features

  • All my life, I’ve always had very vivid, realistic dreams. The oldest dream I can remember is one from when I was 4 or 5.

    In my dream, I was walking down the street with my friend and her mom. We saw two people walk into an elevator, smiling and waving at us as the door closed.

  • I can’t remember if I’ve written a column about a movie before or not. I know that I’ve definitely considered it, but I’m not sure I ever did. If not, well, there’s a first time for everything. Besides this (possibly) being the first time I’ve written about a movie, it’s also the first time in a while I’ve felt so enthusiastic about such a blockbuster.

  • A practice room at NMHU reverberates with the Brazilian beat of a drum set, its tone reminiscent of a steel drum band, of nights spent in tango with handsome strangers under island stars.

    A singer’s voice pierces the rhythm, clear and low, a lone tarnished flute mimicking her vibrato in a sultry call and response. Five musicians breathe together, their sophisticated, sexy music at odds with their casual slacks and sandals. The clouds outside seems to gather to listen; they crowd together, deep reds, blues, vivid orange, the colors of suspense and desire.

  • A stately stone building sits sentry at the Bridge Street entrance to the Las Vegas Plaza, its expertly renovated rough-hewn exterior a study in late 19th Century architecture. Now the administrative home of the West Las Vegas School District, the two-story building looks elegant, composed, serene. It wasn’t always so self-possessed, however. Like many historic buildings in Las Vegas, this property holds colorful secrets.

  • Nature provides Las Vegas with an abundance of sun from which to derive both thermal and electrical energy.

  • “The first step into green is to reduce energy use. How much can you do without? We have a really big footprint. Big Foot had nothing on us.”

    With this challenge to her audience, Director of Facilities Marisol Greene described the dormitory project under construction at Highlands University.

  • A few weeks ago I found out I was going to be an extra in Run For Her Life, the movie that was filming in town. I was told over the phone to bring a few different outfits and my vehicle, and to be at the West parking lot at 6 a.m. Of course I didn’t object to the early hours, even though I hadn’t gotten up that early in months. I mean, who cared? I was going to be in a movie!

  • Blood and Thunder by Hampton Sides is a must-read for anyone living in or near Las Vegas. Sides begins his story of Kit Carson here, and the whole work touches on many 19th century events that took place in and around San Miguel County — events such as Gen. Kearney’s speech to the citizens of Las Vegas in the Plaza (1848), the Battle of Glorieta Pass (1862), and the Taos Revolt (1847). Sides will be discussing and signing his book at Bridge Street’s Tome on the Range bookshop next Tuesday as part of Las Vegas’ Heritage Week celebration.

  • Highlands University’s Performing Arts Club will present “An Afternoon With the Romantics” July 28 at 3 p.m. in Kennedy Hall at 905 University Ave.

    The music of Romantic period composers Brahms and Chopin will be featured, including a highlight of 18 Brahms waltzes. Arias from the same time period, about 1812 to the early 1900s, are also on the program. Beethoven, a Classical-era composer who helped usher in the Romantic period, is also included in the repertoire.

  • A man with a thick drooping mustache barreled into Las Vegas. He bellied up to the Plaza Hotel saloon bar, scores of his rowdy companions drowning their seat-saddle pain with shots of cheap whiskey. Teddy Roosevelt didn’t ride a Harley, but only because they hadn’t been invented yet.

    This weekend, the third annual Rough Rider Motorcycle Rally coaxes a new breed of frontiersmen to the Plaza.