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Today's Features

  • Local artist and photographer Marisol Macias sees ghosts. Well, in the eye of her imagination, at least.

    A collection of Macias’ work, titled “Ghost signs, Ghost Stories,” is on exhibit at Highland University’s Ray Drew Gallery from July 12 through Aug. 10.

  • Theresa Jaramillo and Thomas Martinez are brother and sister, who, after years of working together at local eateries, decided to take a leap of faith; in November 2007, together with Theresa’s husband, Earnest, they took over D’Vino’s restaurant at El Fidel Hotel.

    “It comes naturally to us” said Thomas. “We grew up around the stove, where someone was always cooking. Theresa learned to make rice when she was 5.”

    “We learned from dad and mom, and grandma Tere,” Theresa said.

  • A band whose music has been described as “Sweet island Latin with a jazzy flair of vocals and instrumental solos,” Los Tropicales, was formed 12 years ago in New Mexico.

  • The smell of roasted corn and the vivid music of a mariachi band fill the hot July air. Friends and families are talking and laughing throughout the park. It seems you have found your way to the plaza, where the annual Fourth of July Fiestas are in full swing. Sound interesting?

  • The road to Vida Encantada Nursing and Rehab twists past a subdivision littered with toddlers’ toys, past the great prairie’s golden summer grasses, past the long curved road of life that leads most of its residents home here.

  • Sometimes archaeological treasures turn up in unexpected places. Such is the case with items from a traveling exhibit titled “Outhouse Archaeology” that is displayed at the Las Vegas City Museum this summer.

    The exhibit’s contents come from a historic outhouse located on New Mexico Highlands University’s campus. Expansion of the Donnelly Library in 1995 led to the discovery of a house foundation and outhouse. Highland’s Anthropology Laboratory, under direction of Robert Mishler, excavated the site.

  • This musical and cultural extravaganza will light up the night with Mariachi Music. Old music will find new voices as members of Mariachi Cardenal Infantil, Mariachi Cardenal Juvenil, Mariachi Pantera, Mariachi Sol del Valle, Mariachi Luna de Plata and Mariachi Paisano del Valle present their favorite songs for a concert at the Memorial Middle School Gym this Saturday, June 28, starting at 7 p.m. Baile Ilusion will dance to their set of traditional Mexican folklore songs.

  • The parking lot at University Avenue and Sixth Street bursts with flavor each Wednesday and Saturday now that summer is upon us.

    Farmers drive from the outskirts of town, sometimes from Texas and Oklahoma, to share round lemon cucumbers, deep purple grapes, brown paper bags filled with spinach leaves. June at the Las Vegas Farmers’ Market means the first tender greens, means succulent organic strawberries, means baskets of elongated lime-green pods filled with delectable sweet peas.

  • Summertime is the season that everyone waits for — it means warm weather, barbeques, and most importantly...no school! It means baseball games and swimming and fishing. It means happiness.

    This is the first summer I’m not completely busy. It’s the first summer in a few years that I’ll actually be here for the Fourth of July. Last year I was out of the country for the fourth, so the celebration meant nothing to the British people I was surrounded by. I was disappointed to have missed the fiestas, one of my favorite parts of summer.

  • The black locomotives of the first trains in New Mexico territory belched hot white steam into the tree-lined skies. The Mexican-American war had ended, had left deep distrust in the hearts of the territory citizens, many of whom had lost entire families in the bloody dispute. The largest city in the territory those days was Las Vegas, N.M., a bustling destination with a new depot on the railroad.