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Today's Features

  • Meredith Britt’s work in the upcoming show, “el arte moderno,” invokes a soft but colorful serenity, as though no sound plays a part in the art making. A person of few words with a dry sense of humor and a quiet demeanor, Britt seems quite comfortable in the company of only her paints and canvas.

  • On Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Carnegie Library Park, local activists will team up with featured speaker Magdaleno Rose Avila to help kindle the struggle for justice in Las Vegas.

    Magdaleno Rose Avila grew up in an immigrant family, in southern Colorado where he faced poverty, limited education, stereotyping, drugs, and gangs.

  • The reason people want to come to the Wildlife Refuge is because we miss our mother — the mother of us all, Mother Nature — according to Jan Arrott at the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge. Jan and other members of the Friends of the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge are there for the birds and other wildlife because people need that connection. Human beings long for something that connects us with our roots in nature, with soaring eagles and smooth-sailing cranes.

  • The Concert of the Birds is an annual musical festival that benefits The Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge. The Concert of the Birds has been going on for four years and is hosted by The Friends of the Las Vegas National Wild Life Refuge. Janice Arrott is the organizer.

    “We try and have local Northern New Mexico musicians.” Arrott said. For the past four years there have been a variety of musicians. This year, Los Tropicales is playing.

  • The National Park Service and Fort Union National Monument announces its’ monthly “Glimpses of the Past” presentation. The program will be held at the CCHP/Santa Fe Trail Interpretive Center, 116 Bridge St., in Las Vegas, Thursday, Sept. 18 at 7 p.m.

  • It was the early 13th century, in the Sierra Morena mountains north of Seville. The Spanish were rebelling against centuries-old occupation by the Moors.

    The Spanish soldiers were at a standstill, the Moors controlling all the passes leading to their stronghold, but a shepherd named Martin Alhaja turned the tide — he told the Spanish soldiers of a secret passage, and marked the entrance with the skull of a cow.

  • One of the truisms of permaculture is that problems can be solutions. We tend to view problems in a vacuum, but this is often the result of a limited perspective, and of our failure to ask big enough questions. It is a good discipline, in gardening and in all endeavors, to look at what we believe is a problem, and ask ourselves whether there is some other problem to which the problem before us is a solution.

  • People are always asking me, “Why do you want to leave?” ‘Why would you rather go to Albuquerque when you graduate?’

    Its simple, there is absolutely nothing to do here. There is nothing that can be offered to young adults besides Highlands and Luna. I have to say, though, Highland and Luna can offer a very good education but besides that, there really isn’t much here.

    Speaking as a student and a kid that grew up here in Las Vegas, there isn’t really much that the kids can do.

  • A massive football player, his uniform black, heavy, robotic, runs through a modern city, a flutter of torn books beneath spiked shoes.

    He carries a graduation cap in one hand, stolen from the head of a statued scholar, the other hand extended in an evil claw toward a group of diminutive young children sitting at simple desk — a hawk ready to pluck his prey. The city ignores the indignity; it crowds the horizon with shiny righteousness, a new stadium earning center stage, separating education from progress.

  • Yunus Peer remembers the sting of apartheid in the early ‘70s when he was 13 years old and ranked the No. 2 tennis player among non-whites in South Africa. An Indian, he wanted to compete against all talented players his age, to swing the racket to the best of his ability across the court from any worthy opponent.