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Today's Features

  • Teresa Victor stood, feet planted on the rugged slopes of Cuzco, the capital of the sun-worshiping Inca empire, the spot on earth with the highest ultraviolet light level. This was her third trip to Peru. On a previous trip, she hiked the Inca Trail, the twenty-eight mile ancient road to Macchu Piccu, in nearly impassable terrain high above the Urubamba River canyon cloud forest.

  • My family and I traveled to El Paso for a tennis tournament, but it is the memories of other adventures that I brought back to Las Vegas. We left to El Paso on Friday afternoon and immediately encountered a metal forest. Actually, just west of Santa Rosa, there are about 100 gigantic windmills. They looked like the giant machines from War of the Worlds. It was surreal. We stopped in Vaughn and I had one of the best root beer floats at this restaurant, which looked like an aluminum travel trailer.

  • Snow tries to break the sky, but the clouds hold firm, hold back everything but a dusting of flurries. An armful of ducks dodge the snowflakes, sending a series of rhythmic quacks against thawing ground.

    Spring sends her first hints through feathered messengers, through the choreographed movements of birds traveling home. This Sunday, the Friends of the Las Vegas Wildlife Refuge are sponsoring a free lecture and slideshow on the coming fury of the skies, “Migrating Birds of the Central Flyway.”

  • Douglas Avenue changed overnight. The Coen Brothers’ film crew fixed simple red and white plastic lettering to a vacant office building, adding geriatric walkers, tightly wound ACE bandages, and the promise of pharmacological discount in a carefully orchestrated window display.

  • Two years ago, I was a high school sophomore with no cell phone. Almost everyone I knew had one, but I wasn’t terribly jealous. I lived in a small town and went to a small school. It wasn’t difficult to get a hold of me, and I didn’t think I really needed a cell phone.

  • Four people float in a rain-reminiscent sky, simple grins lighting round faces, arms extended past swollen bodies the colors of spring grass.

    They fly in harmony, in silly joyous formation, a family of Macy’s Parade balloons, perhaps, or a collection of free-wheeling cartoon thought bubbles. Rick Mobbs’ study in watercolors, “Flying,” offers a glimpse into captured serenity, but the artist’s vocation began in a place far from calm.

  • Some days the relentless negative news blaring from the television or computer screen taunts the viewer: the country’s gone crazy! Lunatics are running the world. Days like that, what’s a sane person to do?

  • Joshua Sandoval grins, microphone in small hand. The tiny Los Ninos Elementary School student struts around the stage as if owns it, as if he carries no fear.

    He sings a traditional Latino song with confidence, with an inner peace so fierce, so radiantly happy, his audience can’t help but smile with him. Sandoval, along with other members of the Las Vegas community, will be on the bill for Casa de Cultura’s first Noche de la Trova talent night, Thursday, Feb. 21, at Joe’s Ringside Bar on Grand Avenue.

  • New Mexico Highlands University student Juan Archuleta will be giving a presentation, Thursday, Feb. 21 at the Las Vegas Citizen's Committee for Historic Preservation, about folk music of New Mexico. The talk presents a historical and ancestral interpretation of New Mexico folk music, including rancheras, corridos, romances, and Inditas. Many of these songs originated in Spain and traveled to the New World with the Spanish.

  • A skeleton struts, his feathered hat jauntily tipped over eye socket, along a gallery wall at NMHU’s Burris Hall. He stands before three simple stone-marked graves, one littered with rose petals and a bodiless bony wrist.