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Today's Features

  • Remember all those little stories grandparents used to tell us when we were little, about the Chupacabra and La Llorona? Well, I do.

    I was always fascinated with those stories. I was one of those little kids that believed everything that their grandparents told them. But now that I look back and remember these stories, I start to believe that maybe they’re just an urban legend.

    For Halloween, my grandma use to tell me stories about La Llorona and La Chupacabra. My favorites were the ones about La Llorona.

  • The Highlands Department of music will present an afternoon ofromantic waltzes and lively gypsy songs when the Madrigal choir performs “Brahms In Love” in Ilfeld Auditorium at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 2.

    Directed by Andr Garca-Nuthmann with Linda King at the piano, theall-Brahms program includes vocal works, “Neue Liebeslieder Waltzes,”a portion of “Ein Deutches Requiem” and “Zigeunerlieder.”Inaddition, Linda King will solo in the “Piano Ballade in G. Minor.”

  • World Beat music. Social Justice. Halloween. Raging Grannies.

    Raging Grannies?

    What do these things have in common? It could only be the Wagogo halloween fundraiser for the Las Vegas Peace and Justice Center.

    Every Halloween for several years, the Albuquerque world beat band Wagogo has come to Las Vegas to raise funds for the Las Vegas Peace and Justice Center.

  • Starlings make an awful racket. They start at dusk when coming home to roost. Unfortunately the elm tree was in my front yard in Illinois was that roost. Under the elm tree on the sidewalk and grass, layers of bird droppings reminded us of the floor of a bat cave.

    But it was bird squawks and cries that finally got us on the phone with our local Department of Agriculture. They hooked us up with Dave, the bird man.

  • Kate Alderete, children’s librarian for the Carnegie Public Library in Las Vegas is passionate about writing and youth.

    That’s why she created the “Green Light to Write Project,” a program of the Carnegie Library which gives students hands-on experience and professional training in writing in a variety of genres.

    “I grew up here, and I write,” Alderete said. “I’ve been writing all my life. I wanted to do something kind of academic, but in a different setting, for kids interested in creative writing.”

  • Willa, age 3, runs up to her mom with a library book in hand.“Read me a story,” she begs. Maria Seefz, Willa’s mom, is delighted to read to her daughter.Seefz is an elementary education teacher and is passionate about the value of reading out loud and talking about story books with Willa.

    Seefz only hopes she will find the same strong support for reading in Alamosa, Colo., that they have found at the Carnegie Public Library’s children’s program. The Carnegie program has meant a lot to them both. But they are leaving for Colorado in two weeks.

  • Fear can be many different things to people, not just the bogeyman in the closet.

    Fear for some people is the doll sitting on the shelf, the darkness of the closet or the unknown.

    I was watching this movie where the girl goes to a psychiatric center because she is terrified of the bogeyman. One of the guys there ends up being her really good friend, and he is terrified of the dark. The light in her closet goes out, and he just stands there and won't even help her change it because he is so afraid of what might be in there and what he can't see.

  • Casa de Cultura director Miguel Angel sees the Day of the Dead as a celebration of life. “It is a way to poke fun at death,” Angel said.

    “Since we are all going in that direction, why not laugh at death while we are alive? The flowers and the sugar skulls, the pan dulce, all are reminders that life is sweet.”

    Central features of the day of the dead, or dia de los muertos, are the “ofrendas,” which are altars or memorials to the deceased, and “calaveras,” various representations of skulls and skeletons.

  • In permaculture, we often talk about the design and creation of “invisible structures.” Invisible structures are the cultural constructs which make a community a community rather than just an assortment of isolated individuals in proximity.

    Such invisible systems are all around us. One such invisible structure is the system of currency.

  • Local band Los Tropicales, in its first-ever submission to the The New Mexico Hispano Entertainers Association, has been nominated seven times in four categories.

    Their CD, “Crossing Borders,” has been a regional success since its release in 2007, and their numerous performances throughout New Mexico have been enthusiastically received. Performing on the CD are Mike Romero on vocals and guitars, Leroy “Pato” Lucero on vocals, bass and percussion, Lee Norman Gonzales on vocals, guitar and saxophones, Steve Leger on trumpet, flute, piccolo and percussion.