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Today's Features

  • Robertson High School’s Marr Gym was recently packed with students and parents.

    They weren’t there for a sporting event. Rather, they were honoring academic achievement of the school’s 275 students who have been making good grades this year.

    Superintendent Rick Romero said he thought it was important that people have an opportunity to see the good in the district. He said in recent times the school has received its share of bad publicity because of the actions of a few misguided people.

  • A generalization holds that one learns by interacting with others -- listening, speaking, reading, but what if one cannot hear? We might conclude that being unable to use one of these modalities would result in a disability.

    Not necessarily.

    Take Las Vegas’ Clarence and Faye Falvey. They stress that deafness or being hard-of-hearing is not a handicap, but rather -- a difference. Both were born into hearing and speaking families.

  • Minnijean Brown-Trickey says despite what many people say, she wasn’t courageous in walking past angry mobs to attend Little Rock’s Central High School in 1957.

    She just wanted to go to school.

    Brown-Trickey spoke to several hundred people at United World College on Sunday night, talking about her experiences as one of the Little Rock Nine, the black students who desegregated the Arkansas school under the protection of federal troops.

  • Unveiling a mural two days before Martin Luther King Day, Casa de Cultura Director Miguel Angel quoted King as saying, “Our goal is to create the beloved community, and this will create a qualitative change in our souls, as well as a qualitative change of our lives.”

    Angel said people must become more active in their community.

    “The youth are our focus. Dr. King used to say, ‘A community that does not esteem its youth has no future,’ and we take that to heart,” Angel said.

  • Dolores Maese told a large audience of family and friends that for the last 32 years she loved to go to work because every day she worked with heroes.

    “I have so much respect for those who lay their lives on the line, those who are on the front lines fighting fires, and those who manage the forests and state parks,” Maese said.

    Maese started with the U.S. Forest Service in 1978, rising from a clerk-typist at the Las Vegas Ranger District to a public affairs officer at the regional office in Santa Fe.

  • The words became more difficult as the spelling bee progressed at Paul D. Elementary School last week. And the younger kids began to drop out.

    But third-grader Austen King finished in the top three and stood with fifth-graders A.J Larrañaga and Connor Houdek, who won took first and second places respectively.

    In all spelling bees, there are lessons learned even when kids misspell a word. For example, one of the younger children spelled “honest,” O-N-E-S-T, which makes perfect phonetic sense, and was a lesson in silent consonants and vowels. 

  • Click here to view the School Consolidation Study in PDF format

  • Wendy Armijo doesn’t claim to be a teetotaler. And she won’t tell you to never drink.

    But she draws the line at drinking and driving.

    For the last eight years, Armijo has served as the coordinator for the San Miguel County DWI Planning Council. She says she comes to that role with an understanding.

  • Unlike many dog lovers, Leslie Moniot isn’t looking for purebreds. She prefers mutts.

    That’s because she’s interested in rescuing canines, and plenty of places exist for purebreds. Not so for mixed breeds.

    Over the summer, she moved from a small town in southern California to Romeroville. Since 2001, she’s been providing homes for dogs.

    She takes in large dogs from animal shelters, usually just before they are about to be put down.

  • The dapper gentleman wearing a steel-gray ascot that matches his suit waits at his front door.

    I fumble with my writing tools, exit the car and cross the street. Per his cachet of impeccable elegance, he kisses my hand in true gentlemanly fashion. I feel that “I have arrived.” I had looked forward to talking with this couple — the word was out that they are the essence of the true meaning of volunteerism.