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Today's Features

  • United World College student Jen Kim says she didn’t invent the Empty Bowls Project, a program whose mission is to feed the hungry.

    But her energy brought her love of ceramics and concern for world hunger together at a local event. 

    “I took ceramics in ninth grade, and I really loved the class. It was one of my favorites. We also did an Empty Bowls fundraiser, which is an organization that fights world hunger, so when we I came to UWC, I wanted a pottery activity, but they had discontinued it,” Kim said.

  • When it comes to school, Bonita Baca has always been marked as present. She’s never been a no-show since the beginning of kindergarten.

    Not one single day.

    “I just love school, I love learning,” said the West Las Vegas senior.

    Baca is also a year into her college career, having taken dual-enrollment classes at Highlands University. She maintains a 4.1 grade point average as a senior, and has earned a 4.0 GPA in her studies at Highlands University.

    West Las Vegas Principal Gene Parson said everything about this teenager is impressive.

  • Sometimes dreams do come true, especially as Joe Cocker once sang in his song, “With the help of my friends.”

    Until 6 p.m. Friday, Las Vegans can help a favorite son realize his dream marriage with a click of their mouses.

    For the last three years, a statewide contest has offered a lucky New Mexico couple a $50,000 wedding that includes wedding attire, the ceremony and the reception at the Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort near Albuquerque, and a seven-day honeymoon in Paris.

  • Buses from Belen, Cobre, Pojoaque, Bernalillo, Springer, Maxwell, Santa Rosa and other schools dropped off students to attend College Night on Tuesday.

    The event began a dozen years ago when Luna Community College invited students from Las Vegas and the surrounding area to bring in their juniors and seniors to see what the college offered.

    Highlands University joined Luna the following year, and officials say it has grown every year since.

  • Robertson High School’s Marr Gym was recently packed with students and parents.

    They weren’t there for a sporting event. Rather, they were honoring academic achievement of the school’s 275 students who have been making good grades this year.

    Superintendent Rick Romero said he thought it was important that people have an opportunity to see the good in the district. He said in recent times the school has received its share of bad publicity because of the actions of a few misguided people.

  • A generalization holds that one learns by interacting with others -- listening, speaking, reading, but what if one cannot hear? We might conclude that being unable to use one of these modalities would result in a disability.

    Not necessarily.

    Take Las Vegas’ Clarence and Faye Falvey. They stress that deafness or being hard-of-hearing is not a handicap, but rather -- a difference. Both were born into hearing and speaking families.

  • Minnijean Brown-Trickey says despite what many people say, she wasn’t courageous in walking past angry mobs to attend Little Rock’s Central High School in 1957.

    She just wanted to go to school.

    Brown-Trickey spoke to several hundred people at United World College on Sunday night, talking about her experiences as one of the Little Rock Nine, the black students who desegregated the Arkansas school under the protection of federal troops.

  • Unveiling a mural two days before Martin Luther King Day, Casa de Cultura Director Miguel Angel quoted King as saying, “Our goal is to create the beloved community, and this will create a qualitative change in our souls, as well as a qualitative change of our lives.”

    Angel said people must become more active in their community.

    “The youth are our focus. Dr. King used to say, ‘A community that does not esteem its youth has no future,’ and we take that to heart,” Angel said.

  • Dolores Maese told a large audience of family and friends that for the last 32 years she loved to go to work because every day she worked with heroes.

    “I have so much respect for those who lay their lives on the line, those who are on the front lines fighting fires, and those who manage the forests and state parks,” Maese said.

    Maese started with the U.S. Forest Service in 1978, rising from a clerk-typist at the Las Vegas Ranger District to a public affairs officer at the regional office in Santa Fe.

  • The words became more difficult as the spelling bee progressed at Paul D. Elementary School last week. And the younger kids began to drop out.

    But third-grader Austen King finished in the top three and stood with fifth-graders A.J Larrañaga and Connor Houdek, who won took first and second places respectively.

    In all spelling bees, there are lessons learned even when kids misspell a word. For example, one of the younger children spelled “honest,” O-N-E-S-T, which makes perfect phonetic sense, and was a lesson in silent consonants and vowels.