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Today's Features

  • TODAYHOY
    • Story Time will be at 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20, in the children’s area at Carnegie Public Library. The theme will be “Halloween Countdown.”  The book will be “What a Scare, Jesse Bear” by Nancy White Carlstrom. The craft will be a jack-o-lantern windsock.

  • Submit your calendar items and notices to dgiuliani@lasvegasoptic.com.
    • The Tri-County Farmers Market at Sixth Street and University Avenue will be open until Saturday, Oct. 30. The market is open from 7 a.m. to sellout every Wednesday and Saturday.
    • Volunteers are needed for Girl Scouts to start troops and help girls become more confident and build character. For more information, call Loretta Armijo at (505) 983-6339, ext.12, or e-mail larmijo@gs-nmtrails.org.

  • TODAYHOY
    • Woodmen of the World Lodge 2 is inviting the public to find out what the group has to offer. The lodge is holding a meeting for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 18, downstairs at Charlie’s Spic and Span. People may enter through the back of the building. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, call 425-3189.

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  • West Las Vegas Middle School Principal Steve Sandoval said kids in the Builders Club try to build a lot of goodwill in the community by doing good works.

    “Students are actively involved in community service and service to their school,” Sandoval said.

    Sponsor Sandra Coca said serving the community is at the heart of the the Builders Club pledge.

    “To better my school, my community, my nation and myself; to aid those in need while enhancing leadership capabilities; and to encourage the fellowship of all mankind,” the pledge reads.

  • Sapello-Rociada Fire Chief Kayt Peck says she believes she is the first woman to hold that title in San Miguel County.

    She said she has checked records and could find no indications that other women have served in that role in the county.

    Peck learned her firefighting skills at one of the U.S. Navy’s renowned firefighting training school. After the disastrous fire aboard the USS Forestall during the Vietnam War, sailors received extensive training in putting out all types of fires.

  • The legendary East-West Las Vegas division debate virtually fades in the light of at least one nexus which unites members of the Roman Catholic community on both sides of the Gallinas — and beyond.

    Father George Salazar and Father C. John Brasher, pastors of Immaculate Conception and Our Lady of Sorrows parishes, respectively, agree on a key concept, “One town, one family.” And so it is.

  • Gabriel Garcia has a passion for art that has lived in him since he was a young child. Now he wants to help others by expressing themselves through art.

    Garcia, the youngest child of Ralph and Frances Garcia of Las Vegas, is a humble and gentle soul who expresses his inner emotions and imagination on everything he creates. His life has always been filled with some form of art — drawing, crafts and music.

  • Briana Montaño wants to become the 2011 valedictorian at West Las Vegas High School.

    That would be keeping the honor in the family. The 2010 valedictorian was her sister, Krystle Montaño.

    Principal Gene Parson said Montaño is competitive in academics and is a five-sport letterman, but always competes in a very respectful manner.        

  • Beatrice Maestas-Sandoval and George Ulibarri are master artists in their own right — judging from the array of artifacts tastefully arranged in George’s home and from the works in progress in the adjacent workshop area the two share.

    Beatrice remarks that some of her work is on display at her brother Jose Maestas’ business on Sixth Street.

  • Maggie Romigh is not only a mentor, but a mentor of mentors.

    She has sacrificed financially to work as a community coordinator for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern New Mexico, but said she has been rewarded in countless other ways.

    “When I first came to New Mexico, one of the choices I made was that I was going to do what was important to me, rather than focus on making money,” Romigh said.