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Unionization of college athletes subject of case

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The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The five-member regulatory board that will ultimately decide if Northwestern University football players can unionize has itself been in the middle of a firestorm.

The very makeup of the National Labor Relations Board has been challenged in a case now before the Supreme Court. And Republicans contend the agency has being overly friendly to organized labor.

Northwestern said Friday that it would appeal to the full NLRB a regional director’s ruling that full scholarship players can be considered employees and thus have the right to form a union.

“Unionization and collective bargaining are not the appropriate methods to address the concerns these students are raising,” Alan K. Cubbage, vice president for university relations, said in a statement. “The life of a student athlete is extremely demanding, but the academic side and the athletic side are inextricably linked.”

The appeal is due April 9, with the response from the players April 16. There’s no deadline for the full board to respond.

The current NLRB has a 3-2 Democratic majority. All five current members of the board were appointed by President Barack Obama. Members serve five-year terms.

Actually, the agency has been an easy target for opposition-party politicians in both Democratic and Republican administrations.

Once, as the board found itself without a quorum because Senate Republicans were blocking a vote on two Obama nominees, Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., suggested that “the NLRB as inoperable could be considered progress.”

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, cites “the sorry relationship between unions, big government and the party of big government.”

Democratic leaders dismiss such suggestions. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., calls the board “an important safeguard for workers in America — whether the employees are union or nonunion.”

The Supreme Court case involves appointments that Obama made to the board in January 2012 while Congress was not in session.