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Jaroso Fire Spreads Smoke and Puts Familiar Places at Risk

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HaroldHill
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Tuesday evening (June 25) fire reports indicate the fire was hot on the south side and is still progressing east; south of Pecos Baldy. On the south side, the fire is headed for the ridge just west of Round Mountain and slowly backing to Horsethief Meadow. The fire spotted and grew on the east facing slope on the west side of the Pecos River.

The smoke outlook reported Tuesday afternoon was for lighter winds overnight and this morning, making smoke much more likely to settle into drainages below the fire. Smoke from the Jaroso Fire was predicted Tuesday afternoon possibly to cause impacts east of the fire in Mora and San Miguel Counties, with periods of visibility less than five miles. Smoke-caused visibility of three to five miles would mean air quality termed Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups. At this level, people in sensitive groups should minimize outdoor activities. Everyone else should minimize prolonged or physical activity outdoors. According to fire officials, even if you smell smoke, the air quality may still be good: Visibility distances are the better incication of air quality.

As a precautionary measure, resources have been ordered to protect values at risk that are located south and east of the fire. Values at risk south of the fire include: Jack’s Creek Campground, Iron Gate Campground, Panchuela Campground and structures in Grass Mountain, Pecos Canyon Estates, Winsor, Cowles and the Panchuela area. Values at risk east of the fire include: an electronic site, and numerous structures in Ledoux, South Carmen, Upper Rociada, Gascon, Camp Davis and structures along State Road 276 and Forest Service Road 60.

HaroldHill
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Joined: 10/27/2014
Brief items from July 4 fire report

These are from the July 4, 8 a.m. fire report:

There are sections of the fire that have shown no activity for more than four days. These areas pose no immediate threat of expanding beyond the existing fire perimeter.

Fire growth remains minimal.

The existing spot fires south of Horsethief Meadows should continue to be inactive due to rain, high humidity and the use of helicopter water drops.

All other areas of heat should be minimally active. Fire in the Pecos River remains inactive due to suppression efforts taken there. No impacts are expected in the Pecos River area today.

Heavy fuels on the interior of the fire will continue to burn out producing visible smoke.

HaroldHill
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No Jaroso Fire Update so far today.

No news is good news, isn't it.

HaroldHill
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Joined: 10/27/2014
Weather Remains the Controlling Factor for the Jaroso Fire

July 2, 8 a.m. -- Today’s fire report focuses on the Weather: Mostly cloudy. Rain showers and thunderstorms are likely. Storms may be accompanied by thunder cells producing gusty and erratic winds – winds can turn up to 180 degrees and double in strength in just minutes. Expect slope, valley winds out of the southwest, becoming northwest less than 10 MPH. Ridgetop winds will be northwest at 12 MPH. Today’s expected temperatures will be 63 to 75 degrees.

HaroldHill
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Much Depends on the weather for Jaroso Fire

From fire information released Monday, July 1, 8 a.m., Higher humidity, cloud cover and scattered rain showers have occurred across the fire area proving beneficial in reducing fire activity. Showers and thunderstorms are likely throughout the day. Temperatures will range from 63 to 73 degrees. Slope and valley winds will be light, less than 8 MPH while ridgetop winds will be out of the southeast at 18 MPH.

HaroldHill
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Jaroso Fire Sunday Update

Sunday, June 30, 8:00 -- On Saturday west of the Pecos the fire spotted south of the fire’s perimeter in Horsethief Meadow. Water drops were provided by a heavy helicopter (Type 1) to suppress the activity. To date, the Carson Hotshots have completed five miles of handline northwest from Panchuela Campground.

Today, west of the Pecos, trail improvements in Panchuela Creek will continue, road clearing and preparation will continue from Panchuela Campground to Cowles to Winsor, and wood chipping operations will begin from Panchuela Creek Campground to Winsor Trailhead.

Fire personnel, including Pecos Canyon Fire Department are beginning structure protection for private property on the south flank of the fire in the Pecos River corridor. Opportunities for line construction are being assessed in the Walker Flats area on the east side of the fire. Structure protection plans are being developed as well.

Today’s Weather: Rain, cloud cover and higher humidity are proving beneficial in reducing fire activity. There is a 70 per cent chance of wetting rain throughout the day. Temperatures will range from 63 to 66 degrees. Winds will be light out of the SE at 10 MPH.

HaroldHill
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Joined: 10/27/2014
Saturday morning fire report is posted

Friday (June 29) -- Fire personnel, including Pecos Canyon Fire Department, will continue assessing private lands and structures on the south flank of the fire in the Pecos River Corridor and the east side of the fire in the Las Vegas area.

Ongoing assessment, monitoring and trail prep will take place east and west of the Jacks Creek Campground.

Firefighter, aviator and public safety remain a priority on the Jaroso fire. Despite many challenges, ongoing progress has been made in areas considered to be safe for conducting fire operations.

“High, Hot and Heavy” is a term used by air tanker and helicopter pilots to described high altitude flights over wildfires. Heavy retardant and water loads impede lift (gaining of altitude) and maneuverability. Thin air, squirrely and erratic winds, weather conditions and decreased visibility caused by smoke add to the challenges in navigating high altitude wildfires.

Today’s Weather: Temperatures in the vicinity of the fire will reach 80 degrees with humidity around 30 percent. West northwest winds will be prevalent today. Gusty and erratic winds may accompany thunderstorm activity. There is a 60 percent chance of rain today. Cooler temperatures, high humidity and cloud cover will assist in reducing fire activity.

HaroldHill
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Jaroso Fire Report for Friday Evening and Saturday Pending

Smoke from the Jaroso Fire is expected to decrease, as the chances for wetting rain over the next several days is very good. With minimal growth expectedfor the fire, any smoke produced was deemed as of 2 p.m. on Friday as likely to settle in communities below active fire, in Pecos Canyon Friday night and Saturday morning.

The latest official fire (as opposed to smoke) reports for the Jaroso firesare are dated Friday at 8 a.m. Plans for Friday on the east side of the fire, were to have New Mexico State Forestry continue to identify and develop protection plans for values at risk. The resources working on the east side at that time consisted of one hand crew and several engines.

HaroldHill
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Mora and San Miguel Communities Remain a Concern

Today's (Friday, June 28 Optic has a major story on the Jaroso fire, including announcement of a public meeting scheduled for Friday, June 28 at 5 p.m. at the Pendaries Lodge in Rociada.

The Wildland Fire Management Team, led by Incident Commander Brad McBratney, assumed command of the Jaroso Fire.

The far east side of the fire closest to the Pecos River was not active Thursday. The fire has not crossed the Pecos River. The southern end of the fire, closest to Jacks Creek, was not active. Water drops continued to be effective in cooling down the south end of the fire.

Elsewhere, two columns were visible Thursday. The first was on the far western edge of the fire. It did not travel far, but burned within itself. The second column observed later was on the northeast end of the fire.

However, the most active part of the fire continued to be on the southern and eastern sides. The south part of the fire continues to slow back down into the Horsethief Meadow. The fire is approximately ½ mile west from the Pecos River.

The Carson Hotshots carried out reconnaissance of Hamilton Mesa as a possible contingency line, should the fire cross the Pecos River and proceed east. The same was done on the eastern edge of the Wilderness by NM State Forestry hand crew and engines out of Las Vegas NM. Engine crews were working in the upper Pecos Canyon doing structure assessments.

Although no evacuations have been ordered at this time, officials say residents living in communities south and east of the Jaroso Fire need to be prepared should evacuations be required. To ensure smooth and orderly evacuations, residents should have a go-kit ready. A complete checklist of things residents should consider bringing with them on an evacuation is available online at: http://www.fireadapted.org/role/residents-and-homeowners.aspx.

Smoke: The most significant smoke impacts from the Jaroso fire will be in the communities down-drainage of the fires tomorrow morning. For a detailed smoke forecast visit: http://gacc.nifc.gov/swcc/predictive/outlooks/smoke/swcc smoke outlook.pdf.

HaroldHill
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Not much has changed on Jaroso Fire

Wenesday evening (June 26)fire reports showed little change in predictions for the future of the fire.

Fire managers were able to use air suppression resources with both retardant and water drops to slow the fire'’s progress on the south and east perimeter, the directions most important to Mora and San Miguel county.

A spot fire that had been detected on the east side of the Pecos River Tuesday evening, did not establish itself and wasn'’t visible Wednesday morning.

As a precautionary measure, additional air and ground resources have been ordered to protect values at risk that are located south and east of the fire. Crews are scouting the area above Jack’s Creek for natural trails and features that can be used if needed as fireline.

Smoke was expected to settle Wednesday night in communities below the active fire, in Pecos Canyon and perhaps Santa Fe. There is a potential for smoke impacts in the Santa Fe area today, extending north towards Espanola and south along the Rio Grande towards Santo Domingo Pueblo.

A Wildland Fire Management Team, led by Incident Commander Brad McBratney, is assuming command of the fire. A Wildand Fire Management Team offers the fire suppression skills of a veteran Type II Team, and has additional skills and qualifications to help plan for longer-duration fires.